Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 28.

OpenHatch didn’t run a campaign-style end-of-year fundraiser this year. Frankly, doing such a campaign excellently requires a huge amount of time from planning through fulfillment; bothering everyone with a campaign just didn’t pass cost/benefit. But we truly appreciate all our individual supporters and corporate sponsors (follow links to join them)! They allowed our one paid staffer (Shauna Gordon-McKeon, program director) to focus exclusively on organizing, improving, and organizing organizers for Open Source Comes to Campus events across the U.S. and Canada. We ran 26 Open Source Comes to Campus events this year, along with several in person sprints and IRC-based sprints, tutorials, and information sessions. OpenHatch was also present at many open source conferences, including SCaLE, LibrePlanet, PyCon, AdaCamp, Open Source Bridge, and the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing. Look for a wrap up of last year coming soon, as well as news on how we plan to expand in 2015.

Meanwhile we want to highlight three end-of-year campaigns that ought to interest all readers of this newsletter.

First, a matching campaign led by Sumana Harihareswara to support the open source community in Portland, Oregon. That community is already a global leader in showing how open source can be welcoming, diverse…hospitable. Help it be even more of a guiding light. Sumana is NYC-based, so this is truly a strategic investment, not a ploy to get her local community funded. Read Sumana’s post on the OpenHatch blog for details (and note the match has been extended to December 31 at 1:30pm Pacific, which is 21:30 UTC, just a couple hours!).

Second, Software Freedom Conservancy has begun a supporting member program. Conservancy’s executive director, Karen Sandler, has long been a leader in making free and open source software more diverse; expect more of that next year. (Disclosure: your newsletter editor is a Conservancy director.)

Third, the Free Software Foundation is running its annual campaign. Notably they’ve just released a short video which takes its efforts to make the case that software freedom is crucial for everyone to the next level. We can imagine showing this at Open Source Comes to Campus events!

There are of course many other worthy year-end (and ongoing) charitable opportunities, but these are well aligned with the OpenHatch mission. And again, your direct support of OpenHatch is most appreciated. 🙂

Closing with a non-fundraising “inside OpenHatch” read: Your Django Story: Meet Susan Tan, interview with a core committer on the OpenHatch web application.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

Mozilla Contribution Analysis current findings (slides): “How you respond to interest IS CRITICAL: response time is everything, suggesting work (help start up a ladder of participation) is very helpful

Mako Hill, Ben Lewis, Frances Hocutt, Jonathan Morgan, Mika Matsuzaki and Tommy Guy ran their second set of Community Data Science Workshops at the University of Washington, to the delight of many.

Mozilla community builder and developer / OpenHatch volunteer Emma Irwin ran Hacking Open Source Participation, an online tutorial based off of Open Source Comes to Campus materials.

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The next edition in progress (preview). Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Thanks to Britta Gustafson and Shauna Gordon-McKeon for contributing to this edition!

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.

OpenHatch newsletter, October 2014

by Mike Linksvayer October 31st, 2014

Open Source Comes to Campus SUNY Stony Brook (album) BY-SA

Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 27.

12 upcoming Open Source Comes to Campus events in November:

  • Hartnell College (Salinas, CA – near SF Bay) on Saturday, November 15th
  • Indiana University at Bloomington on Saturday, November 15th (Event Website)
  • Columbia University (NY, NY) on Saturday, November 15th
  • Cornell University (Ithaca, NY) on Saturday, November 15th
  • Swarthmore College (Swarthmore, PA – near Philadelphia) on Saturday, November 15th
  • University of Washington (Seattle, CA) on Sunday, November 16th (Event Website)
  • SUNY Stony Brook (Long Island, NY) on Sunday, November 16th
  • Purdue University (Lafayette, IN) on Sunday, November 16th (Event Website)
  • UC Berkeley (Berkeley, CA) on Sunday, November 16th (Event Website)
  • Baruch College CUNY (NY, NY) on Tuesday, November 18th
  • Per Scholas (Bronx, NY) on Wednesday, November 19th
  • Princeton University (Princeton, NJ) on Sunday, November 22nd

In-depth coverage of OpenHatch program director Shauna Gordon-McKeon’s talk at the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing: GHC ’14 – OpenHatch Open Source Workshop & Getting Into GitHub:

I was surprised that Shauna Gordon-McKeon, Program Director at OpenHatch, didn’t actually discuss the project much. Instead, she gave a quick, practical introduction to open source, which makes sense because the vast majority of GHC ’14 attendees aren’t active in open source communities. Yet.

OpenHatch is a non-profit that helps prospective open source contributors get up to speed on open source culture and find the right project fit. Her talk was a concise version of a bigger workshop OpenHatch offers, called Open Source Comes to Campus. If you or someone you know needs a 1-hour intro to open source, Shauna’s GHC ’14 slides are a good starting point.

Also, based on an interview with Shauna at GHC: How To Get Started In Open Source, Especially if you’re not a white male.

Emma Irwin and Errietta Kostala writeups of Open Source Comes to Campus (with Mozilla) University of Victoria.

Advice on proposing a PyCon poster session, and encouragement: Be a poster child!

Career advice from Sumana Harihareswara compiled on the OpenHatch wiki.

New projects in the OpenHatch volunteer opportunity finder

  • Terminal Overload, “a home-made experimental free and open source multiplayer FPS game”.
  • Phoenix, “an open source emulation frontend” for Linux, OS X, and Windows.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

The grassy roots of growing developer skills with Growstuff.

OpenHatch board member Deb Nicholson reports in LWN.net on a talk about Metrics for free-software communities.

Women in Open Source Award sponsored by Red Hat, accepting nominations through November 21.

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The November newsletter in progress (preview). Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Thanks to Britta Gustafson and Shauna Gordon-McKeon for contributing to this edition!

Read previous newsletters.

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.

OpenHatch newsletter, September 2014

by Mike Linksvayer September 30th, 2014

Deb Nicholson photo by Bryan Smith CC-BY-SA

Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 26.

It’s Open Source Comes to Campus season again! In September we held our third event at CCSF and our second at the University of Minnesota, Morris. You can read write-ups from mentors Jim Hall and Noah Keitel.

In October, we’ll be running events at DePaul University in Chicago, Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, Claremont Graduate University in Los Angeles, SUNY Stony Brook, and the University of Victoria. Let us know if you’d like to mentor!

Interesting recent conversations on OSCTC-planning:

Attending the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing? Come see Shauna speak at Open Source Day. Also keep an eye out for the open source table topic, which will hopefully be announced soon.

Become an Open-source Contributor Video Conference, a panel for women interested in open source in Israel, featuring remote participant Shauna Gordon-McKeon of OpenHatch.

Outreach Program for Women IRC meetings, again featuring Shauna on behalf of OpenHatch.

OpenHatch board member Deb Nicholson received the O’Reilly Open Source Award (photo above).

New projects in the OpenHatch volunteer opportunity finder

  • khmer is “a library and suite of command line tools for working with DNA sequence” – see the homepage for more explanation, and check out the getting started page (including a list of low-hanging-fruit issues).
  • Movie Info takes a list of movies and “generates a nice looking webpage which includes a sortable table containing each movie’s title, cover image, etc.” The author says “it still requires a lot of improvement and would be perfect for someone starting out their ‘open-source career’ to get involved with.”
  • Multiverse Miner is a “sci-fi, incremental RPG” under active development for a new version. It encourages people interested in contributing all kinds of skills (including general feedback and testing) to join its chat channel and start participating.
  • Sanickiosk is “a free, turn-key web kiosk designed for public libraries, city government, health clinics, and other institutions in need of public information stations”. It would like help with publicity and other tasks.
  • sota is “a new dynamic programming language borrowing from python, yaml, bash, ruby f#, perl and c|c#”. It would like contributors of all kinds who might be interested in helping with a programming language in an early stage, including contributing to development and publicity.
  • Xfce is “a lightweight desktop environment for UNIX-like operating systems. It aims to be fast and low on system resources, while still being visually appealing and user friendly.” It would like help with translation, documentation, testing, and bug triaging as well as development – see its contribution start page.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

Meg Ford on Lessons from the Women’s Resume Writing Workshop at LinuxCon.

Open Science Codefest “is participant-driven, and our process will be guided by the Open Source Project Guide: Hackathon/Sprint version.”

Julia Evans on her Strange Loop talk You can be a kernel hacker! and inclusiveness at that conference.

Benjamin Mako Hill’s Community Data Science Workshops Post-Mortem.

Lukas Blakk on improving visual cues for users New to Bugzilla.

Matt Micene on looking for the right open source project to contribute to: “After you do some initial research on the types of ways you can contribute to open source projects of all kind, take time to evalute what projects might be potential good fits for you. A great resource for this is OpenHatch—like a matchmaking service for your skills and goals.”

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The October newsletter in progress (preview). Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Thanks to Britta Gustafson and Shauna Gordon-McKeon for contributing to this edition!

Read previous newsletters.

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.

OpenHatch newsletter, August 2014

by Mike Linksvayer September 1st, 2014

CC-BY Britta Gustafson

Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 25.

We’re at conferences and preparing for northern fall semester Open Source Comes to Campus events! Longer newsletter in a month…until then, welcome newcomers on Software Freedom Day, September 20.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

Gershom Bazerman Letter to a Young Haskell Enthusiast:

The most important thing, though not hardest, about teaching and spreading knowledge is to emphasize that this is for everyone. Nobody is too young, too inexperienced, too old, too set in their ways, too excitable, insufficiently mathematical, etc. Believe in everyone, attack nobody, even the trolliest. … The hardest thing, and the second most important, is to put aside your pride. If you want to teach people, you have to empathize with how they think, and also with how they feel.

Allison Kaptur on Getting Started With Python Internals, called “a textbook example of how to encourage people to dive into something exciting/scary” by Sumana Harihareswara.

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The September newsletter in progress (preview). Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Read previous newsletters.

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.

OpenHatch newsletter, July 2014

by Mike Linksvayer July 31st, 2014

An open hatch in the museum submarine at OMSI in Portland, CC-BY Britta Gustafson

Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 24.

WIRED reports on Open Source Comes to Campus: The Crusade to Bring More Women to Open Source.

Shauna Gordon-McKeon on Deconstructing Contributions at Open Source Bridge.

Mako Hill’s write up of the community data science workshops.

OpenHatch board member Deb Nicholson was honored with an O’Reilly Open Source Award (video) at OSCON.

Shauna Gordon-McKeon participated on a video panel about how to get involved in open source.

Our FOSS Opportunities page is a large and growing list of financially supported opportunities (usually internships) for people (usually students) to work on free/open source projects.

Open Source Comes to Campus planning

The Open Source Comes to Campus fall schedule is being finalized, with over a dozen events set to run at schools from New York to San Francisco, from Morris, Minnesota to Lewisburg, PA. Interested in organizing, volunteering at, or attending an event? Email us!

The planning mailing list has active discussions led by Shauna about improving the curriculum and following up with attendees. Helpful feedback is welcome, especially if you also have experience running outreach workshops. Recent threads include:

New projects in the OpenHatch volunteer opportunity finder

  • Miam-Player, a nice music player. It’s for Windows, Linux, and OS X, written in C++ with Qt.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

Writeup of Geek Feminism’s path to a code of conduct.

Python is now the most popular introductory language at top US universities.

Amanda Menking asks how can a community that values transparency create safe spaces?

Designing for Participation: “created in order to get Mozilla community members to think about how they can structure the work Mozilla does to better enable contributions from anywhere.”

Andy R. Terrel on SciPy2014: “Sheila Miguez pointed out the incredible in-person event handbook from Shauna G. of Open Hatch. I think taking up the principles in this handbook is really needed. We have not made welcoming, goal setting, and clarifying structures a priority at events.”

Article series edited by Jen Wike on young professionals and open source.

Free eDX course, Introduction to Linux “for experienced computer users who have limited or no previous exposure to Linux”.

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The August newsletter in progress (preview). Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Thanks to Britta Gustafson and Shauna Gordon-McKeon for contributing to this edition!

Read previous newsletters.

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.

OpenHatch newsletter, June 2014

by Mike Linksvayer June 30th, 2014

OpenHatch community at Open Source Bridge

Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 23.

OpenHatch had a strong presence at AdaCamp Portland and Open Source Bridge this month. OpenHatch community members Shauna Gordon-McKeon, Britta Gustafson, Sumana Harihareswara (twice!), and Jen Davidson all presented. We also had an OpenHatch dinner at a nearby tea house — picture above, apologies to those who left before we remembered to snap a picture!

Report on teaching open source at UC Davis and Heidi Ellis on Open Source Comes to Campus UMass Amherst and other open source outreach events.

Interested in running an Open Source Comes to Campus event at your school this fall? Contact us! We’re currently planning our fall schedule.

Shauna and Britta talked about OpenHatch on In Beta, a podcast about tech culture and open source.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

Gail Carmichael writes how Python and Pi Helped Make Go Code Girl 2014 A Great Success.

Introductory edit-a-thons how-to. Similar to an Open Source Comes to Campus event, but introducing newcomers to contributing to Wikipedia rather than open source projects. Upcoming following this model: WikiProject Open Barn Raising 2014.

Karen Sandler on what we mean by “we”.

Rachit Gupta uses curated newcomer-appropriate bugs to go from
From Zero Knowledge About Open Source to GSoC
.

Google launches “Made with Code, an initiative to inspire girls to code.”

You’re Welcome: A Pattern Language for Inclusive Events, free book in progress by Alex Bayley, to provide “over a hundred practical steps you can take to make your community events more inclusive, welcoming, and rewarding.”

Interactive semi-automated package review (by abusing Travis-CI) — to improve mentorship, by Asheesh Laroia.

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The July newsletter in progress (preview). Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Thanks to Britta Gustafson and Shauna Gordon-McKeon for contributing to this edition!

Read previous newsletters.

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.

OpenHatch newsletter, May 2014

by Mike Linksvayer June 1st, 2014

Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 22.

Open Source Comes to Campus held events at Hartnell College and UC Davis. Pictures are up (Hartnell, Davis) with blog posts coming soon.

Reports on Open Source Comes to Campus events at Princeton and SUNY Stony Brook.

This summer, OpenHatch has a Google Summer of Code student and project! Elana Hashman is working on a bug set creator to help event and sprint organizers collect and annotate lists of bugs for their event participants to work on. To learn more about the project, you can visit its blog, and subscribe to the feed for project updates throughout the summer.

New projects in the OpenHatch volunteer opportunity finder

  • xoreos, “A reimplementation of BioWare’s Aurora engine (and derivatives)”.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

Christie Koehler is creating an open planning checklist “to help those leading projects have an open planning processes in order to enable community participation” and wants your feedback.

Elisabeth Greenbaum Kasson writes Women Have a Long Way to Go in Open Source.

The last two session of the Community Data Science Workshops at UW happened in May, with the help of OpenHatch community members Shauna Gordon-McKeon, Asheesh Laroia, and Elana Hashman.

The Strange Loop conference is doubling down on diversity.

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The June newsletter in progress (preview). Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Thanks to Britta Gustafson and Shauna Gordon-McKeon for contributing to this edition!

Read previous newsletters.

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.

OpenHatch newsletter, April 2014

by Mike Linksvayer April 30th, 2014

Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 21.

Report on PyCon US 2014 forthcoming. Videos feature many talks by OpenHatch-related people and on OpenHatchy topics!

Free ebook How to get started with open source includes a chapter on Open Source Comes to Campus Q&A by Shauna Gordon-McKeon.

Reports on Open Source Comes to Campus events recently held at UMass Amherst and Rutgers.

Four Open Source Comes to Campus events were held this month, at George Mason University, SUNY Stony Brook, Northeastern Illinois University, and MIT. Pictures and blog posts coming soon! Next month is Hartnell College on May 3rd and UC-Davis on May 10th. There’s still room for students and mentors at both! Click the links to sign up.

OpenHatch participant Kyzz wrote about what he has learned from asking and answering questions on our IRC channel.

Bruce Byfield writes in Linux Magazine on OpenHatch: Non-profit advises projects, helps volunteers and The birth of SpinachCon.

Philip Durbin attended the recent OpenHatch event at MIT, found out about AppInventor, and his 7 year old just made her first app.

New projects in the OpenHatch volunteer opportunity finder

  • Blindspot, “an accessible Windowless Windows desktop app, focussing on providing access to the Spotify service to blind or partially-sighted screen reader users”.
  • SCons, “an improved, cross-platform substitute for the classic Make utility”.
  • Oscar, “an open-source ecommerce framework for Django”.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

Community Data Science Workshops at UW — “designed with lots of help and inspiration from Shauna Gordon-McKeon and Asheesh Laroia of OpenHatch and lots of inspiration from the Boston Python Workshop.”

Programming Languages and RailsGirls.tw transcript and slides from talk by Audrey Tang.

Steve Klabnik on How to be an open source gardener.

Rachel Nabors writes Of GitHub and Pull Requests (and comics).

Bonnie Bogle on Women Who Code @Mapbox.

Julie Evans on not feeling guilty about not contributing to open source, and when to contribute.

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The May newsletter in progress (preview). Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Thanks to Britta Gustafson and Shauna Gordon-McKeon for contributing to this edition!

Read previous newsletters.

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.

OpenHatch newsletter, February 2014

by Mike Linksvayer February 28th, 2014

Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 19.

Our goals in 2014 for Open Source Comes to Campus.

Introducing setup sprints: getting project installation, documenation, and contribution process ready for contributions by newcomers, especially students at Open Source Comes to Campus events.

Things newcomers to open source rarely ask but often wonder, Shauna Gordon-McKeon writes at opensource.com.

In 2014, let’s make open source software more usable, Asheesh Laroia guest-posts on the Open Source Software & Usability blog.

Julie Pichon, [openstack-dev] Interested in attracting new contributors?

OpenHatch doesn’t spam, you get one email a week if one or more people
indicated they want to help. The initial effort is not time-consuming,
following OpenHatch’s advice [4] you can refine a nice “initial
contact” email that helps you get people started and understand what
they are interested in quickly. I don’t find the time commitment to be
too much so far, and it’s incredibly gratifying to see someone
submitting their first patch after you answered a couple of questions
or helped resolve a hairy git issue. I’m happy to chat about it more,
if you’re curious or have any questions.

In any case if you’d like to attract more contributors to your project,
and/or help newcomers get started in open-source, consider adding your
project to OpenHatch too!

OpenHatch discussed on Hacker News.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

The Ada Initiative on HOWTO design a code of conduct for your community.

Jennifer Dixey:

openhatch.org/ looks a little bit like Drupal Ladders for the whole world of OSS. Contributing is easier than ever! via @thecodepath

drupalladder.org:

The Goal of the Drupal Ladder is to have 1% of the Drupal Community contributing to core.

A week of articles on women in open source at opensource.com.

A career panel of sorts, in an article: These Women Are Building The Software That Quietly Runs The World.

Women Outnumber Men For The First Time In Berkeley’s Intro To Computer Science Course; will they have the opportunity to contribute to open source? Related: Can early computer science education boost number of women in tech?

The Scistarter project finder is a little bit like the OpenHatch volunteer opportunity finder, but for science projects.

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The March newsletter in progress (preview). Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Read previous newsletters.

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.

OpenHatch newsletter, January 2014

by Mike Linksvayer January 31st, 2014

Welcome to OpenHatch newsletter number 18.

OpenHatch at Grace Hopper Open Source Day:

Two events – one past, one future – have come out of Open Source Day. Sri Raga Velagapudi, our technical facilitator, invited us to Rutgers. Within two weeks we were able to pull togethera great event! We’ve also been in touch with Andrea Frost, Director of Leadership Development for Western Washington University’s Association for Women in Computing, who hopes to run an Open Source Comes to Campus event at her school sometime this year. Andrea emailed us soon after the event to say “thank you so much for taking the time to walk us through the tutorial. My classmate and I were attending our first open source event ever in our lives, and we were a bit intimidated at the beginning. It was great to meet your team and to have some fun in a group setting.” Needless to say, this is the kind of email that makes our work feel worthwhile.

Open Source Comes to Campus: notes and photos of events at University of Minnesota at Morris and Columbia.

We’re setting our Open Source Comes to Campus schedule for the winter/spring semester. Interested in volunteering for a local event or helping remotely? Have a potential sponsor? Get in touch.

On January 4, several contributors, including brand-new contributors, met up at a cafe in San Francisco to work on an OpenHatch website sprint! We used our own advice from the In-Person Event Handbook for organizing it. We reviewed a pile of pull requests, edited documentation, fixed some bugs, and ate tasty sandwiches – see Asheesh’s extensive notes on the mailing list.

Practical thread on OH-events list concerning how to approach disengaged attendees.

In Asheesh Laroia’s Inbox:

“I had a student stop by the office today and tell me that Saturday’s event was a real game changer for him.”

New projects in the OpenHatch volunteer opportunity finder

  • python-requests, “an Apache2 Licensed HTTP library, written in Python, for human beings”.
  • Retroshare, a “cross-platform, Friend-2-Friend and secure decentralised communication platform”.

OpenHatchy but not OpenHatch things around the web

Video of Linux.conf.us talks by Ashe Dryden (Programming Diversity) and Karen Sandler (Bringing More Women to Free and Open Source Software).

Planet Women in Free Software aggregate blog.

Leslie Hawthorn’s Nerd Story: What You Say to Young Girls Matters.

Python for Adults:

The third, and perhaps most important strength of Python is its user community. I’m sure this will be the most controversial part of this post, but I’ve found the Python community has bar-none the most supportive users. This is not by accident, but part of Python’s legacy and current commitment to inclusion. Python came from a teaching language background, and documentation was, and continues to be part of that legacy. Python is used as a teaching language in High Schools as well as MIT.
In addition, the Python Foundation focuses a lot of attention and energy into community diversity through its Diversity Statement, as well as commitment to bring women into the community, both through their own local communities (PyLadies) but also focusing on bringing that diversity into mainline events such as PyCon. The net effect is that Python is not only welcoming to women, but has a general welcoming atmosphere to people of virtually any background.

Also check out links submitted to /r/openhatch, and add your finds!

Get involved

You can help write this newsletter! The February newsletter in progress. Join our publicity list or hop on #openhatch with suggestions and questions.

Thanks to Britta Gustafson and Shauna Gordon-McKeon for contributing to this edition!

Read previous newsletters.

Like +1, follow @openhatch at identi.ca or Twitter.